Thursday, October 1, 2009

Cuba: Hemeroteca ( New York Time). NY...


Photo New York Time
_________________________________________

Le toca a Cuba mover ficha, dice el senador cubanoamericano Roberto Menéndez
El senador demócrata por el estado de Nueva Jersey, Robert Menéndez.


(Radio Martí) El senador Roberto Menéndez, democráta por el estado de Nueva Jersey, dijo a Radio Martí que tras las medidas tomadas unilateralmente por Washington, ahora le toca al gobierno cubano realizar cambios.


Menéndez manifestó que ahora el régimen no tiene excusas para continuar en el inmovilismo que le ha caracterizado por medio siglo.

Se refirió asimismo a la visita de la Subsecretaria de Estado adjunta para América Latina, Bisa Williams, quien tras la visita sobre el correo directo entre Cuba y Estados Unidos permaneció cinco días más en la isla hablando sobre temas bilaterales.

Preguntado sobre el contenido de esas conversaciones Menéndez declaró que él no fue informado por el Departamento de Estado sobre el contenido de las mismas pero que, no obstante, no cree que ello tenga que ver con un acercamiento al régimen de La Habana.

Desde Washington, Luis Alberto Muñoz, con más detalles.

__________________________________________

No more free lunch in Raul Castro's Cuba

HAVANA — President Raul Castro is taking a bold gamble to ease communist Cuba's cash crunch by eliminating a costly government lunch program that feeds almost a third of the nation's population every workday.

The Americas' only one-party communist government, held afloat largely by support from its key ally Venezuela, is desperate to improve its budget outlook; the global economy is slack, and Havana is very hard pressed to secure international financing.

Raul Castro, 76, officially took over as Cuba's president in February 2008 after his brother, revolutionary icon Fidel Castro, stepped aside with health problems.

Though some wondered if Raul Castro would try to move Cuba's centralized economy toward more market elements, so far he has sought to boost efficiency and cut corruption and waste without reshaping the economic system.

And so far it has been an uphill battle, something akin to treading water.

But now, Raul Castro has moved to set in motion what will likely be the biggest rollback of an entitlement since Cuba's 1959 revolution -- starting to put an end to the daily lunch program for state workers, as announced Friday in Granma, the Cuban Communist Party newspaper.

In a country where workers earn the average of 17 dollars a month, and state subsidized monthly food baskets are not enough for families, more than 3.5 million Cuban government employees -- out of a total population of 11.2 million -- benefit from the nutritionally significant free meal.

The pricetag is a cool 350 million dollars a year, not counting energy costs or facilities maintenance, Granma said.

But that will come to a halt in four ministries experimentally from October 1, Granma said. As workers stream to the 24,700 state lunchrooms, the government "is faced with extremely high state spending due to extremely high international market prices, infinite subsidies and freebies," Granma explained.

Parallel to the cutback, workers will see their salaries boosted by 15 pesos a workday (.60 dollar US) to cover their lunch.

It is a dramatic shift in Cuba, where the government workers' lunchroom has been among the longest-standing subsidies, though even authorities have called it paternalistic.

And more troubling, especially for authorities, is the fact that the lunchrooms' kitchens have become a source of economic hemorrhaging, from which workers unabashedly make off with tonnes of rice, beans, chicken and cooking oil to make ends meet.

The Castro government is keen to reduce the 2.5 billion dollars a year it spends on food imports, which it has to buy on the international market in hard currency.

"Nobody can go on indefinitely spending more than they earn. Two and two are four, never five. In our imperfect socialism, too often two plus two turn out to be three," Raul Castro said in an August 1 address alluding to corruption problems.

Some Cubans were aghast at the idea of losing a free lunch.

"What am I going to buy with 15 pesos," asked a bank worker, who spoke on condition of anonymity. "I cannot even make anything, even something horrible, at home for that little."

But Roberto Reyes, a construction employee, said sometimes the state lunch is so bad, he would rather not eat it -- and pocket the small monthly raise.

The president has said health care and education were not cuts he would willingly make.

But Cubans wonder how long it will be until the legendary monthly ration books with which Cubans receive limited basic food goods, such as rice and beans, for free, come under the budget axe.

Source: AFP

_____________________________________________

U.S. envoy in Cuba met with officials, citizens



Reuters
Wednesday, September 30, 2009; 12:37 AM

HAVANA (Reuters) - A senior U.S. diplomat who participated in recent talks in Havana about resuming bilateral mail service with Cuba stayed around to meet with Cuban officials and other Cubans in the latest sign of thawing U.S.-Cuba relations.

A spokeswoman for the U.S. Interests Section in the Cuban capital said on Tuesday that Bisa Williams, acting deputy assistant secretary for Western Hemisphere affairs, was in Cuba for several days after the September 17 meeting, holding the previously unannounced meetings.

The spokeswoman said Williams met with Cuban officials and with members of Cuba's "civil society," and went to the western province of Pinar del Rio to tour facilities there.

"The Cubans helped set things up for her," the spokeswoman said.

She would not confirm reports that Williams also met with Cuban dissidents.

U.S.-Cuban relations have begun slowly warming under U.S. President Barack Obama, who has said he wants to "recast" relations that have been hostile since a 1959 revolution that put Fidel Castro in power and led to Cuba's transformation into a communist state.

He has lifted limits on Cuban Americans traveling and sending money to Cuba, and initiated talks with Havana on migration and mail service, the latter aimed at reinstating direct postal service between Cuba and the United States suspended since August 1963.

The two governments issued positive statements after both meetings and said more would be held in the future.

EMBARGO STILL IN PLACE

The first round of migration talks was held in New York in July, and a second round is tentatively set for December in Havana. They had been suspended since 2004 by Obama's predecessor, George W. Bush.

The U.S. also has suggested to Cuba that travel limits currently imposed on their respective diplomats in both countries be lifted.

In a small but symbolic gesture, Washington also turned off in July a news ticker in the window of the U.S. Interests Section in Havana that the Cuban government had viewed as an affront to its sovereignty.

Since the ticker was turned off, Cuba has mostly taken down large flags it placed in front of the interest section to block the ticker from view.

Despite the thaw, Obama has said he will maintain the 47-year-old U.S. trade embargo against Cuba until the Cuban government shows progress on human rights and democracy. Cuba has said it views those as strictly internal issues not subject to negotiation.

Two weeks ago, Obama signed a yearly renewal of the act that imposes the embargo, which Cuba blames for most of its economic problems.

Cuban Foreign Minister Bruno Rodriguez said in speech to the United Nations General Assembly on Monday that Cuba has long wanted normal relations with the U.S. and acknowledged that Obama had taken some positive, but small steps in the right direction.

But he said Obama has not yet done enough and he expressed concern that right-wing forces in the United States still wield great power.

"The crucial thing is that the economic, commercial and financial blockade against Cuba remains intact," Rodriguez said.

(Reporting by Jeff Franks; Editing by Eric Walsh)

Fuente:

Full Legal Notice

________________________________________

Cuban artists are granted visas to the U.S.; permits issued for the first time since 2003

The flow of artists and musicians between Cuba and the U.S., choked off since 2003, has begun to trickle again.

(foto1)

The most famous voice to hit stateside from the island is Omara Portuondo, the lone female artist from the Buena Vista Social Club, who has received a visa to perform in the U.S. in October. Omara, who just got a Latin Grammy nomination for Best Contemporary Tropical Album for her album Gracias, will perform during the San Francisco Jazz Festival on Oct. 20 and at UCLA on Oct. 23. The Latin Grammys will be held on Nov. 5 in Las Vegas; no word yet on whether Omara will attend.

(foto2)

Also coming to the U.S.will be composer and conductor Zenaida Romeu who was granted a visa in early September to travel to Fargo, N.D., (of all places!) in mid-November to guest-conduct the Fargo-Moorhead Symphony Orchestra. Back in the '90s, a number of Cuban groups made the rounds of college and community performance series across the U.S., garnering an audience in the heartland. Romeu is director of the all-female Camerata Romeu, a chamber music group I was lucky enough to hear on my first visit to Cuba in 1997.

(foto3)

The last name in this group is trovador Pablo Milanés, who'll go not quite to the U.S. but to the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico in October.
All this comes on the heels of Juanes' historic Havana concert on Sept. 20, but these visas have been in the works for months. Another mostly off-the-radar event, which saw a Cuban theater group collaborate with the University of Alabama on performances of Shakespeare, took place this summer. And the New York Philharmonic is planning performances on the island, though dates haven't been set yet.
Meanwhile, the king of Latin crooners, Julio Iglesias, recently said that he would play Cuba if asked. And René 'Residente' Pérez, outspoken frontman for alt-reggaeton act and multi-Latin Grammy nominee Calle 13, has said he'd like to do a concert in Havana. This summer, Ricardo Arjona complained that he had been planning a Cuba concert, but would pass on the idea since Juanes had announced his big event.
It remains to be seen whether the Obama administration will throw its full support behind such cultural and people-to-people exchanges the way Clinton did, or whether the softening affect of the Juanes concert will move that process along. Juanes recently played the Clinton Global Initiative Gala in New York City, where the former president congratulated him backstage. I don't know, however, if Hillary was in the audience. And a new poll by Bendixen and Associates, which shows an about-face in Cuban-American opinion on the Juanes concert, was released at the Americas Conference in Miami Wednesday – which seems a clear attempt to show policy-makers' that exile opinions have changed enough to make those cultural exchanges politically palatable stateside.
–JORDAN LEVIN.

Posted by Renato Perez at 06:46 PM

Foreign firms can't access their own funds

Many foreign companies doing business in Cuba are barred by the authorities from removing funds from their bank accounts for no apparent reason, a Reuters report says. "Hundreds of millions of dollars" are unavailable, foreign diplomats and businessmen told the news agency.

(foto)

"Representatives of some companies with investments or joint ventures on the island said they were bracing for the possibility of not being able to repatriate year-end dividends paid to their accounts in Cuba," Reuters said.
According to a foreign diplomat, suppliers "involved with tourism, foreign-exchange stores and spare parts and machinery for industry are negotiating partial payments [...] but the little guy, for example with supplies on consignment, has simply been abandoned."
For the full story, click here.
–Renato Pérez Pizarro. Posted by Renato Perez at 08:32

Source : Cuban Colada
___________________________________________

Congress in the Driver's Seat?


Today we hear from New York that the Cubans are approaching the United Nations annual vote on the U.S. embargo, scheduled for Oct. 28, in a more cautious manner than they did when the Bush Administration was on the other side of the table. After seventeen years of running up the score, maybe they figure they can afford to be a bit conciliatory. In any case, they hardly seem ready to give away the store in negotiations. Foreign Minister Bruno Rodriguez has said that Cuba is ready engage the United States in direct talks any time. However, Cuba would not address any "internal issues." And they would expect to talk about how the United States embargo is responsible for $223 billion of damage to the Cuban economy. And they want the United States to change its policy on Cuban immigration. And they want us to stop bombarding the island with Radio and Television Marti. And while they're at it, they want Guantanamo back.

Even in the context of the steady drumbeat of positive moves that the Administration has taken on Cuba, it is not quite conceivable that U.S.-Cuba talks could really brook these types of issues. But we're clearly in a better place in our relationship than we've been in a long time. The U.S. isn't breaking any speed records as it rolls out its review of Cuba policy, but then again, the infrastructure of the embargo was a long time in preparation. The process underway now is clearly what Denis McDonough was talking about when he told the New York Times' Mark Landler that "engagement should be judged as a means to an end, not as a policy goal in itself." That's what we are doing: talking about issues of mutual, practical concern.

This is all to the good, but of course it isn't going to lead to a quick resolution of our longstanding conflict. Most of the commentaries on this page have been highly critical of the Obama administration for not pushing ahead with an opening to Cuba many had hoped for during the campaign. It’s hard not to agree. From a big picture perspective, we have nothing to lose but the chains that have bound us to this anachronism. As we open to Cuba, and time marches on, Cuba will get freer.

If, however, in addition to the steady, quiet drumbeat of positive steps from the executive branch (freer travel for Cuban families, substantive migration talks, re-opening mail links, much more liberal rules around sending packages to Cuba -- this one for all Americans, not just Cubans) the president asked Congress to lift the travel ban, it would signal the end game. Some in Congress would put up a vitriolic fight. But it would be a fight without the broad implications of the many other difficult national debates we face, like on health care or immigration. The fact is, even though the failed Cuba policy has caused tremendous pain for those involved, most of the rest of us wonder what that’s all about and why, in an age when China finances our wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, we still care what kind of government Cuba has. When Ben Stiller introduced Juanes at the Clinton Global Initiative the other night, it was with an air of gratitude for the man who had brought a million people or so into Cuba’s main plaza. For the vast majority of Americans -- including those Americans who serve in Congress -- this is not a controversy. The vast majority of Americans, like Ben Stiller, think: yeah, why are we still embargoing that country, anyway?

Like it or not, given the packed agenda the administration faces, it would be a mistake to expect the president to jump in with both feet on Cuba. It is the pragmatic modus operandi of this administration to prioritize its challenges and spend its capital only when it's game time. From the Employee Free Choice Act to the public health care option, there’s a long list of issues where the President’s views are clear, but he hasn’t pushed them aggressively right from the gate. Time will tell whether that’s a good move or not; if, in a year or two, he hasn’t gotten anywhere on these issues, that will speak for itself. On the other hand, if he demonstrates progress on the truly difficult issues: Israel/Palestine, Afghanistan, Pakistan and Iran, then he can turn to second-tier foreign policy problems like Cuba. And if things have gone reasonably well, Cuba will not be so a tough after all.

But where does that leave those of us who care about Cuba? It might not be Iraq, but its pretty painful for the families this terrible conflict has torn apart. And it won't get better without sustained, grown-up attention. And that means that, for better or worse, Congress is in the driver’s seat right now. We should hope Sam Farr is right – and not fatally premature – when he says the votes are there to pass the bill that would open Cuba travel to everyone. Keep watching this space! If the broad spectrum of actors from trade and travel spheres can rally around one bill, it is very conceivable that the Congress can let the president ride in the back on this one.


Cuba : Dice que “no ha llegado la hora de sentarse” a dialogar con Zelaya...

Foto: AFP PHOTO/ Jose CABEZAS

El presidente de facto de Honduras, Roberto Micheletti, afirmó hoy que “no ha llegado la hora de sentarse” a dialogar con el depuesto gobernante, Manuel Zelaya, y rechazó por inconstitucionales algunos aspectos de la propuesta de un empresario que incluye la llegada de tropas extranjeras al país.

“No ha llegado en ningún momento la hora de sentarse” con Zelaya, dijo Micheletti, aunque confirmó que representantes de las partes en conflicto y de otros sectores “están platicando, están hablando, para ver cómo esta situación lleva calma y podemos lograr el objetivo” de resolver la crisis causada por el golpe de Estado del 28 de junio.

Reiteró que es posible ese encuentro con Zelaya para culminar el diálogo, pero que primero deben hacerlo sus comisiones.

“Al final del túnel alguien tiene que firmar una documentación de esta naturaleza y desde luego que tienen que ser las partes en conflicto“, expresó Micheletti en rueda de prensa en la Casa Presidencial.

Comentó que las pláticas iniciales “han mantenido un poco la calma a nivel de Tegucigalpa“, tras varios días de disturbios luego de que Zelaya apareciera el pasado día 21 en la embajada de Brasil en Tegucigalpa, donde permanece.

El Gobierno de facto ha suspendido las garantías constitucionales mediante un decreto que restringe las libertades de movilización, reunión y prensa, entre otras.

Micheletti subrayó que sigue “abierto” al diálogo dentro de la mediación del presidente de Costa Rica, Óscar Arias, y expresó su desacuerdo con que a alguna nueva propuesta que surja se le considere como un “Acuerdo de San José II“.

¿Y por qué tendría que ser un Acuerdo de San José II?, si ese es un acuerdo que presentó don Óscar Arias. Es un acuerdo con 12 puntos, y lo que hay que hacer es discutir los 12 puntos, quitar algunos de los que causan el problema interno y dejar los que podrían ser factibles de reformar”, expuso.

La propuesta de Arias, enfatizó, “tiene algunas cosas que no permite la Constitución de la República, pero lo escrito en San José no es pétreo, se puede perfectamente reformar”.

Micheletti calificó de “especulaciones”, “aspiraciones” y “sueños” algunas versiones que circulan en la prensa sobre posibles soluciones de la crisis, pero consideró que “es bueno” divulgarlas.

En particular, señaló que la propuesta del empresario Adolfo Facussé, que incluye la llegada de tropas extranjeras para garantizar el cumplimiento de un eventual acuerdo, “abarca cosas” que no se pueden ejecutar porque “la Constitución no lo permite”.

“Tomaremos unos de los puntos que él expresa”, añadió Micheletti, e instó a “ir analizando qué es la realidad, qué es lo que puede ser realidad y qué es lo que es un sueño”.

Facussé encabeza un grupo de empresarios que propuso que Micheletti renuncie si Zelaya es repuesto nominalmente en el cargo, pero bajo arresto domiciliario, mientras el gabinete de ministros gobierna el país con la supervisión de tropas extranjeras.

Por otra parte, Micheletti dijo que son “bienvenidos” los diputados brasileños que cumplirán mañana una visita para conocer la situación de la Embajada de su país, donde se encuentra Zelaya.

Fuente EFE/ Via N24

______________________________________

Militares silencian medios pro Zelaya en Honduras


Soldados montan guardia fuera de la estación de televisión Cholusat Sur Canal 36 después de su cierre en Tegucigalpa. AP

  • ‘‘Mel’’ teme asalto a embajada

El Gobierno interino suspendió por decreto el derecho a la libertad de asociación y movimiento durante 45 días

TEGUCIGALPA, HONDURAS.- Militares hondureños sacaron ayer del aire dos medios de comunicación leales al depuesto presidente Manuel Zelaya, estación de televisión “Cholusat Sur Canal 36” y “Radio Globo”, cuyos llamados a sus seguidores para una “ofensiva final” naufragaron ante las medidas de excepción decretadas por el Gobierno de facto.

El Gobierno interino suspendió por decreto el derecho a la libertad de asociación y movimiento durante 45 días, abortando marchas y disturbios en la dividida Honduras.

Pocos centenares de simpatizantes de Zelaya se reunieron frente a la Universidad Pedagógica Nacional en el Centro de Tegucigalpa para reclamar por la restitución del derrocado mandatario, pero decidieron no marchar hacia la embajada de Brasil tras ser advertidos por la Policía.

“El Gobierno de facto quiere aplacar las protestas y la salida de la gente a las calles para consolidarse en el poder, pero nosotros buscamos nuevas estrategias para continuar manifestando hasta que retorne al poder Manuel Zelaya”, dijo el líder sindical Israel Salinas.

Unos 200 policías antimotines estaban apostados en las inmediaciones, con escudos, palos y latas plateadas de bombas lacrimógenas colgadas en sus arneses.

Mientras tanto, Zelaya advirtió que los militares podían allanar la embajada de Brasil.

La OEA espera resultados

El secretario general de la Organización de los Estados Americanos (OEA), José Miguel Insulza, dijo en Washington que aunque el presidente de facto, Roberto Micheletti, endureció su posición, cancilleres del organismo podrían viajar el jueves a Honduras para intentar mediar.

“Esa visita se va a hacer cuando haya algún resultado que obtener”, dijo. “Yo no voy a llevar un grupo de cancilleres solamente a estar en Honduras para saber cómo están las cosas”.

Y para la OEA y el resto de la comunidad internacional, el resultado pasa por la restitución de Zelaya.

De última hora, el Gobierno de facto invitó de nuevo a la OEA para que envíe una delegación a partir del próximo viernes.

Condenan agresión y suspensión de garantías

SIP

La Sociedad Interamericana de Prensa (SIP), condenó un decreto del Gobierno de Honduras que suspende libertades públicas como los derechos de asociación, reunión y expresión.

La institución consideró como una “medida absurda” que las autoridades puedan disponer la censura y cierre de aquellos medios de comunicación que pudieran estar “perturbando la tranquilidad nacional, llamando a la insurrección popular y dañando psicológicamente a sus auditorios”.

El presidente de la SIP, Enrique Santos Calderón, dijo: “Más allá de las políticas editoriales que puedan tener los medios hondureños, absolutamente todos deben tener la libertad de informar como lo manda el Artículo 72 de la Constitución, sin censura previa”.

Guatevisión

El Gobierno de Guatemala y el noticiero de televisión Guatevisión expresaron su enérgica condena e indignación por la agresión que sufrieron en Honduras dos periodistas guatemaltecos que cubren la crisis política en ese país.

El subdirector de Guatevisión, Eric Salazar, explicó que el reportero Alberto Cardona y el camarógrafo Rony Sánchez, quien también trabaja para Televisa (México), fueron agredidos y golpeados por las Fuerzas de Seguridad cuando cubrían ayer el cierre de la Radio Globo, afín al depuesto presidente Manuel Zelaya.

Por su parte, el presidente en funciones de Guatemala, Rafael Espada, dijo que en su Gobierno están “preocupados e indignados” por la agresión a los periodistas guatemaltecos, que están en Honduras desde el pasado miércoles.

El Informador : CRÉDITOS: AFP / RMP
__________________________________________

Micheletti dilata el encuentro con Zelaya, aunque hay contactos

El presidente de facto de Honduras afirmó que "no ha llegado la hora de sentarse" a dialogar con el depuesto gobernante, pero reconoció que delegados de ambas partes trabajan por un acuerdo "No ha llegado en ningún momento la hora de sentarse" con Zelaya, dijo Roberto Micheletti, aunque confirmó que representantes de las partes en conflicto y de otros sectores "están platicando, están hablando, para ver cómo esta situación lleva calma y así lograr el objetivo" de resolver la crisis causada por el golpe de Estado del 28 de junio.

Además, reiteró que es posible ese encuentro con Zelaya para culminar el diálogo, pero que primero deben hacerlo sus comisiones.

"Al final del túnel alguien tiene que firmar una documentación de esta naturaleza y desde luego que tienen que ser las partes en conflicto", expresó Micheletti en rueda de prensa en la Casa Presidencial.

Comentó que las pláticas iniciales "han mantenido un poco la calma a nivel de Tegucigalpa", tras varios días de disturbios luego de que Zelaya apareciera el pasado día 21 en la embajada de Brasil, donde permanece.

El gobierno de facto ha suspendido las garantías constitucionales mediante un decreto que restringe las libertades de movilización, reunión y prensa, entre otras.

Micheletti subrayó que sigue "abierto" al diálogo dentro de la mediación del presidente de Costa Rica, Óscar Arias, y expresó su desacuerdo con que a alguna nueva propuesta que surja se considere como un "Acuerdo de San José II".

"¿Y por qué tendría que ser un Acuerdo de San José II?, si ese es un acuerdo que presentó don Óscar Arias. Es un acuerdo con 12 puntos, y lo que hay que hacer es discutir los 12 puntos, quitar algunos de los que causan el problema interno y dejar los que podrían ser factibles de reformar", expuso.

La propuesta de Arias, enfatizó, "tiene algunas cosas que no permite la Constitución de la República, pero lo escrito en San José no es pétreo, se puede perfectamente reformar".

Micheletti calificó de "especulaciones", "aspiraciones" y "sueños" algunas versiones que circulan en la prensa sobre posibles soluciones de la crisis, pero consideró que "es bueno" divulgarlas.

En particular, señaló que la propuesta del empresario Adolfo Facussé, que incluye la llegada de tropas extranjeras para garantizar el cumplimiento de un eventual acuerdo, "abarca cosas" que no se pueden ejecutar porque "la Constitución no lo permite".

"Tomaremos unos de los puntos que él expresa", añadió Micheletti, e instó a "ir analizando qué es la realidad, qué es lo que puede ser realidad y qué es lo que es sueño".

Por otra parte, Micheletti dijo que son "bienvenidos" los diputados brasileños que cumplirán mañana una visita para conocer la situación de la Embajada de su país, donde se encuentra Zelaya.

Fuente: Infobae
______________________________________

Reprimen a los seguidores de Zelaya en Honduras

TEGUCIGALPA

Militares y policías hondureños detuvieron el miércoles a decenas de seguidores del depuesto presidente Manuel Zelaya que acamparon tres meses para exigir su restitución en el poder, al intensificarse las restricciones a las libertades civiles por parte del régimen de facto.

La represión se profundizó pese a la promesa del gobernante de facto, Roberto Micheletti, quien dijo el lunes que iba a "derogar'' el estado de sitio impuesto el domingo, medida criticada por Estados Unidos y partidarios del derrocamiento de Zelaya.

"Estoy dispuesto a hacerme a un lado si es necesario. Todas las opciones deben estar sobre la mesa, excepto la cancelación o el no reconocimiento de las elecciones del 29 de noviembre'', afirmó Micheletti al diario chileno La Segunda, mientras Zelaya permanece refugiado en la embajada de Brasil en Tegucigalpa.

"Las elecciones del 29 de noviembre son la solución legal y justa a la actual crisis'', agregó Micheletti, quien ha tenido un discurso conciliador mientras refuerza la represión, incluida la clausura de los únicos dos medios opositores de Tegucigalpa: Radio Globo y el Canal 36 de televisión.

Unos 100 soldados y policías antimotines desalojaron al amanecer del miércoles a campesinos que acampaban en la sede del Instituto Nacional de Reforma Agraria en Tegucigalpa y arrestaron a 55 personas. La fiscalía determinará si les abre una causa penal a los detenidos por infringir el estado de sitio, informó el portavoz de la Policía Nacional, Erlin Cerrato.

La Organización de Estados Americanos (OEA) confirmó que el viernes llegará a Tegucigalpa una misión que preparará la visita del secretario general, José Miguel Insulza, y cancilleres, prevista para el próximo miércoles.

La misión será encabezada por el secretario de Asuntos Políticos de la OEA, Víctor Rico, y se unirá en Honduras a John Biehl, asesor de Insulza, que pudo quedarse el domingo en el país luego de que el régimen de facto expulsara a otros cuatro enviados de la OEA.

Cientos de seguidores de Zelaya protestaron el miércoles frente a los estudios de la silenciada Radio Globo, mientras a corta distancia policías antimotines y militares los vigilaban. ‘‘Queremos a Radio Globo''; "pueblo que escucha, únete a esta lucha'' y "el pueblo unido jamás será vencido'', gritaban los manifestantes.

A una cuadra de la casa de gobierno, unos 20 periodistas de Radio Globo y del Canal 36 protestaron para exigir la devolución de los equipos ocupados por la Policía y la reapertura de ambos medios, cuyos estudios permanecen bajo custodia militar.

Ambos eran los únicos medios opositores al régimen de facto y promovían la restitución en el poder de Zelaya, quien lleva nueve días en la embajada brasileña en Tegucigalpa.

Los reporteros y otros trabajadores de la Radio han continuado trabajando y suben la señal a internet, de donde es tomada y retransmitida al aire por pequeñas radios hondureñas de provincia y una emisora salvadoreña que se escucha en Tegucigalpa.

El obispo auxiliar de Tegucigalpa, Juan José Pineda, aseguró ayer que ha habido avances en el diálogo en que actúa como "puente'' entre Micheletti y Zelaya, y propuso reanudar las negociaciones en San José bajo mediación del presidente de Costa Rica y Premio Nobel de la Paz, Oscar Arias.

Entretanto, el Tribunal Electoral solicitó el miércoles al presidente de facto Roberto Micheletti que derogue un decreto de emergencia que limita los derechos civiles, preocupados de que de su vigencia pudiera afectar los comicios programados para noviembre, informó la agencia AP.

Micheletti, quien se reunió en la presidencia con los magistrados del Tribunal Electoral, dejó entrever que el decreto seguirá vigente por unos días más, al menos mientras consulta con diferentes sectores para "derogarlo oportunamente''.

"A nosotros nos interesa que no exista ninguna posibilidad de que se cuestione'' el proceso electoral, aseguró el magistrado David Matamoros. "Hemos solicitado... que sea derogado [el decreto] para que, insisto, no haya ninguna duda, ningún cuestionamiento, sobre la legitimidad'' de las elecciones, apuntó.

El magistrado David Matamoros dijo que "hemos solicitado... que sea derogado (el decreto) para que, insisto, no haya ninguna duda, ningún cuestionamiento, sobre la legitimidad" de las elecciones.

Los políticos conservadores temen que el decreto ponga en peligro los comicios de noviembre, que ven como la mejor esperanza para que Honduras recupere el reconocimiento internacional después del golpe de estado del 28 de junio que derrocó a Manuel Zelaya. Las votaciones fueron programadas antes del golpe contra Zelaya, cuyo mandato presidencial vence en enero.

"No debe de darse armas a los enemigos de la democracia, el arma para destruir el proceso", dijo el magistrado Enrique Ortez.

Fuente: AFP


Oficina de EEUU en Cuba no invita a disidentes a coctel...

Oficina de EEUU en Cuba no invita a disidentes a coctel

Los disidentes Vladimiro Roca (izquierda al frente), Martha Beatriz Roque (derecha al frente), Elizardo Sánchez Santacruz, Guillermo Fariñas y Francisco Chaviano, de izquierda a derecha, hablan a la prensa extranjera el 26 de agosto del 2008, en La Habana.
Los disidentes Vladimiro Roca (izquierda al frente), Martha Beatriz Roque (derecha al frente), Elizardo Sánchez Santacruz, Guillermo Fariñas y Francisco Chaviano, de izquierda a derecha, hablan a la prensa extranjera el 26 de agosto del 2008, en La Habana.
AFP/Getty Images

Disidentes cubanos declararon el miércoles estar complacidos de que una funcionaria estadounidense de visita en la isla se hubiera reunido con ellos, pero expresaron cierta molestia al conocer que a un coctel diplomático celebrado por representantes de Estados Unidos sólo se invitó a cubanos simpatizantes del gobierno.

Un informe de la BBC citó que un funcionario de la misión diplomática estadounidense en La Habana había dicho que "los disidentes no fueron invitados'' a la recepción del martes por la noche. Un portavoz de la misión afirmó que la lista de invitados "no favorecía a un grupo sobre otro'', pero no niega directamente el informe de la BBC.

Mientras tanto, el gobierno cubano y los medios de prensa oficiales guardaron silencio el miércoles sobre la visita de Bisa Williams, subsecretaria de asuntos hemisféricos del Departamento de Estado, la funcionaria estadounidense de mayor rango en visitar La Habana desde el 2002.

Williams fue a la isla en visita oficial para reunirse con funcionarios cubanos a discutir una posible reanudación de los servicios de correo directo entre ambas naciones. Pero fuentes de Estados Unidos confirmaron el martes que se reunió también con el viceministro de Relaciones Exteriores de Cuba, Dagoberto Rodríguez, con los disidentes, y asistió al concierto de fin de semana del rockero colombiano Juanes.

Funcionarios estadounidenses en Washington restaron importancia al significado de la visita de seis días de Williams.

"Yo no diría que eso cambia nada en nuestras relaciones con Cuba'', afirmó el vocero del Departamento de Estado, Phillip Crowley, a la Agence France Presse. "Pero evidentemente coincide con los esfuerzos del Presidente por aumentar el libre flujo de información... entre Estados Unidos y el pueblo de Cuba''.

Pero los representantes republicanos de la Florida Ileana Ros-Lehtinen y Lincoln y Mario Diaz-Balart escribieron de inmediato el miércoles al subsecretario de Estado, William J. Burns, solicitando información completa sobre la visita de Williams a La Habana.

"Si lo que se reporta es correcto, la visita de rutina de la señora Williams a Cuba fue mucho más allá de su propósito explícito y se convirtió en casi una cumbre con funcionarios del régimen cubano'', indicó el documento.

Disidentes de La Habana entrevistados por teléfono dieron asimismo poca importancia a su reunión con Williams más allá del reconocimiento simbólico de su trabajo por parte de Estados Unidos durante el almuerzo de la diplomática con unos 15 activistas de los derechos humanos y otras causas.

"Nuestra reunión fue algo coherente con la decisión del gobierno de los Estados Unidos de mantener contactos con el gobierno de Cuba sin renunciar [al derecho de reunirse con] los representantes de la sociedad civil'', indicó Elizardo Sánchez, presidente de la Comisión Cubana de Derechos Humanos y Reconciliación Nacional, quien señaló que altos funcionarios europeos de visita en Cuba rara vez se reúnen con los disidentes.

"Ella dijo que quería escuchar nuestros criterios'', indicó el conocido disidente Vladimiro Roca. "Pero lo más importante es que ella fue la primer funcionaria que se reúne con nosotros desde que Barack Obama llegó a la presidencia. Nadie más, ningún europeo hace eso''.

Sánchez y Roca dijeron que Williams les dijo que ella quería "completar su visión de la realidad cubana'', y ellos hablaron sobre sus exigencias para la liberación de presos políticos, el fin de la represión política y la necesidad de que haya reformas políticas.

Williams dirigió la oficina de Cuba del Departamento de Estado durante dos años antes de ser ascendida a subsecretaria de Estado.

Crowley indicó que las conversaciones de Williams con funcionarios del Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores de Cuba se centraron también en "detalles prácticos'' de las operaciones de la misión diplomática de Estados Unidos en La Habana. En ausencia de relaciones diplomáticas directas, ambos países mantienen "secciones de intereses'' en sus capitales.

No obstante, ambos gobiernos restringen rigurosamente los movimientos de los diplomáticos. Funcionarios estadounidenses se han quejado en repetidas ocasiones del acoso sufrido por sus diplomáticos en La Habana por parte de la Seguridad del Estado cubana.

Tanto Roca como Sánchez manifestaron sentirse molestos hasta cierto punto, sin embargo, con la ausencia de disidentes en el coctel celebrado en la noche del martes por la Sección de Intereses de Estados Unidos en La Habana.

Fernando Ravsberg, corresponsal de la BBC, reportó que "por primera vez en 10 años, la disidencia cubana no fue invitada a una recepción diplomática... En su lugar, los funcionarios estadounidenses invitaron a decenas de artistas, intelectuales y académicos''.

"La mayoría de los asistentes fueron... personas que de un modo y otro están relacionadas con el gobierno. Ninguno de ellos había asistido a una de esas recepciones durante una década'', añadió Ravsberg. Las autoridades de la Sección de Intereses "no parecen estar tratando de ocultar el cambio en su política''.

Miembros de la Seguridad del Estado advierten por lo general a funcionarios y partidarios del gobierno que eviten encuentros diplomáticos a los que hayan sido invitados disidentes.

"Yo recibí la invitación, y no recibí ningún mensaje en contra de ella, así que fui'', dijo el ceramista José Fuster, según Ravsberg.

Roca indicó que la Sección de Intereses tiene la prerrogativa "de invitar a quien quiera'', pero añadió una crítica: "Con la situación económica [de Estados Unidos] como está, a lo mejor ya había demasiados invitados''.

"Ellos dicen que fue un encuentro con el mundo de la cultura, con la intelectualidad, y en este caso con la intelectualidad que es aceptada por el gobierno'', agregó Sánchez. "Nosotros tenemos también intelectuales. Yo no sé por qué esos no fueron invitados''.

Un vocero de la Sección de Intereses en La Habana, quien pidió mantener el anonimato debido a la política del Departamento de Estado, dio algunos detalles sobre la recepción, pero repetidas veces se abstuvo de aclarar si se había invitado o no a disidentes.

Con una asistencia de unos 200 cubanos, la recepción fue concebida como un "encuentro cultural'' para presentar a la nueva funcionaria de asuntos culturales de la Sección de Intereses, Gloria Berbena, y a su vice, Molly Koscina, ambas recién llegadas a La Habana, según el vocero.

"Ellas estaban dispuestas a conocer a tantas personas como era posible, y de los grupos más diversos posibles'', añadió el vocero. "Nuestra intención esa noche fue la de celebrar un evento cultural. Dentro de ese contexto, no existió ningún otro significado''.

Al preguntársele si la lista de invitados excluía a los disidentes, el vocero aseguró que el evento "no se propuso centrarse en ningún segmento en particular''. Luego añadió: "No querríamos identificar en qué lugar están'' del espectro político.

Fuente: jtamayo@elnuevoherald.com

______________________________________

Costa Rica nombra embajador en Cuba

El gobierno costarricense designó el miércoles al periodista y diplomático José María Penabad como nuevo embajador en Cuba, medio año después de que el presidente Oscar Arias decidiera restablecer relaciones diplomáticas con el gobierno de la isla.

El ministro de Presidencia y hermano del mandatario, Rodrigo Arias, realizó el anuncio luego de la habitual reunión semanal del gabinete. Indicó que las autoridades cubanas dieron el lunes el beneplácito a Penabad, quien desde el 2003 se desempeñaba como cónsul en La Habana.

Penabad se convertirá en el primer embajador costarricense en Cuba luego de interrumpidos los lazos oficiales en 1961 y restablecidos por Arias en marzo.

En esa ocasión, el gobernante comentó que si Costa Rica había "podido pasar la página con regímenes tan totalmente opuestos al nuestro como en su tiempo la Unión Soviética y más recientemente con China, cómo no hacerlo con un país que es geográfica y culturalmente más cercano, como Cuba".

Fuente: The Associated Press

______________________________________________

Costa Ricans Marrying Cubans Detained in Havana

Costa Rica's Consul General in Cuba, José María Penabad, says that Costa Ricans who travel to Cuba with the intent of marriage with Cuban nationals, have been detained and some deported by Cuban authorities, charging them with "trafficking of persons".

Penabad expressed his concern over the increase of the number of Costa Ricans who arrange for travel to Cuba with the promise of marriage, in most cases not having ever met the intended spouse, who end in Cuban prisons.

Cuban officials say that the intention of the marriage is to "legally" remove the person from Cuba and are taking strong measures against it.



The Consul said that in the past week, at least seven Costa Ricans have been deported or detained at the Cuban international airport José Martí, who admitted to visiting Cuba with the intention of marriage. Penabad said that they are immediately accused by Cuban officials as being financially insolvent and trafficking in persons and immediately taken to immigration jail. In other cases, days later Cuban officials catch with the person and deport them.

Some Cubans see marriage to a Costa Rican as a way out of Cuba, a situation that is arranged by lawyers in Costa Rica through Cuban contacts.

According to Dirección de Migración y Extranjería, there have been 50 marriages registered at immigration by Costa Ricans to Cubans between August 2005 and January 2006. Cubans wanting to visit Costa Rica need a visa issued by the Consulado de Cuba, which it is not permitted to issue, but, if marriage is involved, the visa can then be issued by the Costa Rican immigration service,

Roberto Tovar, Costa Rica's Chancellor, said that he will forward the report by his Consul in Cuba to immigration officials.

Fuente: InsideCostaRica
______________________________________________________________

Cuba/ Relaciones Cuba- España

Cubamatinal/ La noticia del viaje del Ministro de Exteriores español es abordada por la prensa española, según la cual no se producirán reuniones del representante español con la disidencia.

Madrid, 28 de septiembre/ LD-EFE/ Representantes de la disidencia cubana han denunciado la ausencia de contactos que tienen con el Gobierno español y han dado por hecho que el ministro de Asuntos Exteriores y de Cooperación, Miguel Angel Moratinos, no se entrevistará con ellos en la visita que prevé hacer a la isla en octubre.

El activista Oswaldo Payá, premio ‘Andrei Sajarov’ a los derechos humanos del Parlamento Europeo en 2002, declaró desde la isla que “no ha habido ningún contacto del Gobierno español ni de su Embajada con el Movimiento Cristiano de Liberación” -del que es fundador- con respecto a la próxima visita del ministro.

Payá añadió que no va a pedir ningún encuentro con el ministro ya que Moratinos “marcó su postura de no dialogar con la oposición” en la anterior visita que hizo a la isla, en abril de 2007, cuando su departamento ofreció a los disidentes un encuentro con el entonces director general para Iberoamérica, Javier Sandomingo, una vez que Moratinos hubiera abandonado la isla, a lo que la oposición se negó. “Si el Gobierno español ha cambiado esa postura, que sea él el que tome la iniciativa“, señaló.

El ex preso político Elizardo Sánchez, presidente de la Comisión Cubana de Derechos Humanos y Reconciliación Nacional, también lamentó el “nulo” contacto con la Embajada española en La Habana, por lo que no confió en ser recibido por el ministro Moratinos o alguno de sus subordinados.

Sánchez confió en la “buena fe” de la diplomacia española al apostar por un acercamiento con las autoridades cubanas pero consideró que el Ejecutivo de José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero ha “apostado demasiado fuerte” por la relación con el régimen, que hace todo tipo de “promesas que luego no cumple”.

Desde España, el coordinador general de Cuba Democracia Ya!, Rigoberto Carceller, pidió al ministro que aclare si va a la isla a “tomar el pulso a toda la sociedad cubana” y si pretende “apuntalar la transición a la democracia” o por el contrario a la dictadura. Carceller reclamó además al ministro que se entreviste con representantes de la oposición en España antes de viajar a la isla, o que lo haga cuando llegue a La Habana.

El vicepresidente de la Unión Liberal Cubana, Antonio Guedes, también dio por hecho que el ministro no se reunirá con la disidencia y advirtió de que no sería aceptable que el Ministerio propusiera a la oposición un encuentro con un director general en lugar del ministro.
Para Guedes, la visita de Moratinos a la isla sólo busca preparar la modificación de la posición común de la UE hacia Cuba - que avala la posibilidad de aplicar sanciones diplomáticas contra la isla- con el objetivo de que José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero pueda viajar a La Habana durante la presidencia española de la UE y se cuelgue “la medalla” de haber normalizado por completo las relaciones entre Cuba y los Veintisiete, lo que beneficiaría los intereses de España en la isla.

Guedes no descartó que el régimen realice algún “gesto” para convencer a la UE como el que realizó en febrero de 2008 -meses antes de que la UE eliminase definitivamente las sanciones a la isla- de liberar a cuatro presos políticos, a los que obligó a abandonar el país.

Un portavoz del departamento que dirige Moratinos confirmó que la agenda de tres días del ministro en la isla incluye hoy por hoy entrevistas con su colega, Bruno Rodríguez, y “autoridades cubanas”. La misma fuente indicó que tampoco está previsto que representantes del Ministerio reciban a miembros de la oposición cubana exiliados en España antes de la visita de Moratinos, que según ha confirmado él hoy mismo, se producirá en torno al 18 de octubre.

Fuente:Cubamatinal

_______________________________

Piden al Congreso eliminar restricciones de viajes de estadounidenses a Cuba

http://www.tierracuriosa.com/2007/06/18/capitolio-usa/

WASHINGTON

Activistas de todo EE.UU. presionaron hoy en el Capitolio por la aprobación de una ley que levante las restricciones de viaje a Cuba para todos los estadounidenses, como prueba del "cambio'' prometido por el presidente Barack Obama hacia la isla.

Durante un encuentro en el edificio Rayburn de la Cámara de Representantes, varios líderes del Congreso y más de 70 activistas de una decena de estados indicaron que la veda a los viajes viola un derecho fundamental de los estadounidenses y que estos ayudarían a promover un cambio en la isla.

Según los partidarios de la ley, entre ellos los demócratas Charles Rangel, Bill Delahunt, y el republicano Jeff Flake, Estados Unidos ha intentado por más de cuatro décadas aislar económica y diplomáticamente a Cuba sin que eso surta buenos resultados.

Agregan que es hora de probar algo distinto y que la medida tiene suficientes apoyos en la cámara baja y en el Senado para ser aprobada antes de fin de año.

La Ley de Libertad de Viajar a Cuba (''Freedom to Travel to Cuba Act''), presentada en marzo pasado, fundamentalmente permite que todos los estadounidenses viajen a la isla, no sólo los cubanos que tengan familiares allí. La excepción sería en casos de guerra o en los que los estadounidenses afronten un peligro inminente.

La ley, que podría ser sometida a audiencias el mes próximo, requiere 218 votos en la cámara baja y 60 en el Senado, pero esta afronta oposición de republicanos y grupos en el exilio que denuncian la continua violación de los derechos humanos en la isla.

En abril pasado, Obama levantó las restricciones de viajes y remesas de cubanoestadounidenses, impuestas bajo el mandato de George W. Bush, y abrió la posibilidad de que las compañías de telecomunicaciones puedan ofrecer servicios de telefonía celular en la isla.

Además, el Gobierno de Washington ya permite desde hace varios años la venta de productos agrícolas estadounidenses a Cuba por unos 500 millones de dólares anuales, como excepción al embargo que permanece en pie desde 1962.

Consultados por Efe, algunos expertos que participaron en el encuentro de hoy consideraron que las medidas emprendidas por Obama hasta la fecha son limitadas e insuficientes.

''Me decepciona que no se estén haciendo más cosas con mayor rapidez, porque la mayoría de los estadounidenses apoya la flexibilización del embargo. No tenemos nada que mostrar a cambio del embargo que lleva décadas'', dijo John Block, secretario de Agricultura bajo la Administración de Ronald Reagan.

''Viajamos y hacemos negocios con China y con Vietnam, ¿no somos hipócritas con esto? Deberíamos abrir el comercio con Cuba, porque con este embargo sólo le seguimos dando excusas al régimen en La Habana'', agregó Block.

Por su parte, Wayne Smith, ex jefe de la sección de Intereses de EE.UU. en Cuba (1979-1982), consideró que Obama ‘‘no ha hecho nada'' y que, para comenzar a propiciar un cambio, "deberíamos iniciar un diálogo, y levantar las restricciones de viaje''.

''Que un puñado de legisladores bloquee la legislación es una vergüenza, cuando la mayoría de los estadounidenses y la nueva generación de cubanoamericanos quieren que mejoren las relaciones con Cuba'', enfatizó.

La jornada, que los organizadores calificaron como un ‘‘día de educación de los legisladores'', se produce en medio de un aparente deshielo en las relaciones entre EE.UU. y Cuba, que han reactivado las reuniones sobre inmigración, suspendidas en 2004, y analizan la posible reactivación del servicio de correos, suspendido en 1963.

Bisa Williams, subsecretaria de Estado adjunta para Latinoamérica, se reunió recientemente en La Habana con funcionarios de alto rango en Cuba para tratar un amplio abanico de temas, y pudo visitar una instalación agrícola y áreas afectadas por huracanes en la provincia occidental de Pinar del Río, indicó el martes el Departamento de Estado.

Se trata de la funcionaria de mayor rango del Departamento de Estado que visita La Habana desde 2002.

El lunes, el canciller cubano, Bruno Rodríguez, dijo ante la Asamblea General de la ONU que el Gobierno de Obama podría tomar una serie de medidas que demuestren una "verdadera voluntad de cambio'', entre estas el levantamiento de la veda a los viajes de todos los estadounidenses.

Fuente: EFE/ Via ENH/ilustra LPP