Monday, October 5, 2009

Cuba : Hemeroteca ( New York Times & Daily News ) New York...

Cuban Americans going back home


A woman is welcomed by relatives after arriving from U.S. at the Jose Marti airport in Havana.
A woman is welcomed by relatives after arriving from U.S. at the Jose Marti airport in Havana.
Credits: Galeano/AP
Published: 04/14/2009 15:37:01

_______________________________________________________

Cuban prospect Juan Miranda beats former Yankee Kyle Farnsworth, Royals

Wednesday, September 30th 2009, 4:00 AM
Juan Miranda gets the pie in the face from A.J. Burnett after his game-winning single in the bottom of the 9th inning of the Yankees 4-3 win.
Antonelli/News
Juan Miranda gets the pie in the face from A.J. Burnett after his game-winning single in the bottom of the 9th inning of the Yankees 4-3 win.

Add a flashback meltdown by Kyle Farnsworth to the Yankees' propensity for last-gasp heroics, and you get Tuesday night's 4-3 ninth-inning win over the Royals at the Stadium.
Entrusted with a one-run lead in the ninth, Farnsworth finally paid dividends for the Yanks after three mostly cringe-worthy seasons in the Bronx. The former Yankee setup man coughed up two runs in the ninth, including rookie call-up Juan Miranda's game-ending RBI single off the reliever's leg for the Bombers' major-league leading 15th walkoff victory.
"It's great to see the young guys come through in those situations," Joe Girardi said. "We had (Francisco) Cervelli (earlier this month), we had a great hit from (Ramiro) Pena (Monday) night with his first (major-league) home run. And Juan had a great year at Triple-A, and we like the way he swings the bat. For him to get that hit, it's a special night for him and a good night for us."
Miranda, a 26-year-old first baseman from Cuba, hit .290 with 19 homers and 82RBI at Triple-A Scranton this year, his third in the Yankee system.
The 15 walkoffs mark the most by the Yanks since they set a club record with 17 in 1943. They also lead the majors with 50 comeback wins, one more than they managed last season.
Farnsworth, who has a 4.82 ERA in 41appearances for Kansas City this season, fanned Brett Gardner to open the ninth. But singles by Cervelli and Eric Hinske and a sacrifice fly by Robinson Cano, who entered the game defensively in the top of the ninth, tied the game. Hinske then stole his first base of the season and lumbered to third when catcher John Buck's throw sailed into center field. "They gave me the green light, and I saw (Farnsworth) didn't slide-step the first pitch, so I went on the second one," Hinske said.
After Johnny Damon was walked intentionally and took second on defensive indifference, Miranda's hard comebacker bounded off Farnsworth's leg into foul territory for an RBI single. All that was left was another wild celebration across the infield and the customary cream pie in the face from A.J. Burnett during Miranda's postgame interview. "I was very happy. I was waiting for it, because I know I'm a part of the team," Miranda said, with Pena interpreting. "I've been following on the TV and I've seen all those pies and all those moments, and I was happy to get it."

Source:Daily News
___________________________________________________

Cuban Civil Defense Teams Keep Swine Flu at Bay





Published: October 4, 2009
Filed at 12:29 a.m. ET
HAVANA (AP) -- Cuba is ready to use just about everything at its disposal, from its well-oiled civil defense system to the soldiers of a totalitarian government, to keep swine flu cases to a minimum.
Everything but a vaccine.
As the U.S. prepares an extensive health survey for side affects from its massive inoculation plans, Cuba's No. 2 health official says relying on a shot to contain a world pandemic is risky as best -- and demoralizing at worst.
''Nobody knows if it would work,'' Dr. Luis Estruch told The Associated Press in an interview. ''How safe would it be?''
Cuba's sophisticated public-monitoring system and geographic isolation as an island have kept swine flu cases to just 435 in a country of 11 million -- and no deaths to date. That's roughly one in 25,000 people, compared with one in 6,900 in the U.S. and one in 4,000 in Mexico.
Swine flu plans for the new season involve all ministries, including the armed forces. If necessary, the government will isolate neighborhoods or entire villages, shut down highways and dispatch medical teams to communities affected by swine flu, Estruch said.
Soldiers can go door-to-door to enforce mandatory quarantines and evacuations -- and authorities think nothing of severing areas from all contact with the outside world.
''In a matter of hours, we can determine what resources to send,'' Estruch said. ''We've thought it out. ... We've considered what to do if we have to paralyze a town, if we have to stop public transit, if we have to close the schools.''
It works -- but only at the cost of individual freedoms, said Jose Azel, an economy specialist at the University of Miami's Institute for Cuban and Cuban-American Studies.
Cuba ''certainly has advantages to do what it wants to do that we can't -- commanding people,'' he said.
Globally, the virus has caused at least 3,205 deaths since it first appeared in Mexico and the U.S. earlier this year, the World Health Organization says. More than a quarter-million cases worldwide have been confirmed, though most are mild and don't require treatment.
This fall, the U.S. government plans to track possible side effects as it attempts to vaccinate more than half of the 300 million population in just a few months.
It's not that Cuba isn't up to the task of developing a vaccine.
Cuba's Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology makes nearly 100 products, including more than three dozen drugs to fight infectious diseases. The island also has 12,000 registered scientists, impressive for a tiny and poor nation, reflecting the importance the government places on medicine and science.
''If we had confidence in a vaccine, we would get it,'' Estruch said. ''Immediately.''
But he warned against promising a cure for a flu strain that can evolve at any time. And he cited the 1976 U.S. campaign to vaccinate millions against a swine flu epidemic that never happened.
Hundreds of U.S. citizens blamed that vaccine for other illnesses, including Guillain-Barre Syndrome, a neurological disorder that generally is reversible but can cause permanent paralysis and in some cases is fatal. Lawsuits cost the U.S. government almost $100 million.
Instead, Cuba has its civil defense system, which has proved invaluable in carrying out mass evacuations and saving lives during hurricanes that batter the Caribbean island nearly every year.
Its disaster-response machine -- overseen by President Raul Castro and the armed forces -- is organized at the block level in every town, and the government collects health data daily from its extensive network of neighborhood clinics.
''When it comes to hurricanes, there are people in each area who are responsible for keeping track of everyone -- who will need assistance, pregnant women, the elderly, which buildings are vulnerable,'' said Wayne Smith, a former top U.S. diplomat in Cuba who is now with the Center for International Policy in Washington. ''It's sort of the same thing with the health system.''
That's how the island detected its first swine flu cases.
For two weeks after Mexico reported the outbreak on April 24, Cuba's health ministry monitored everyone who arrived from that country before instituting the monthlong travel ban with almost no advance notice on May 1.
Ten days later, Cuba confirmed its first cases: three Mexican students who had recently arrived from Mexico and were studying in three different locations.
''We detained them in a matter of hours,'' Estruch said.
The students were treated and allowed to stay in Cuba.
Also working in Cuba's favor is its health care system. Treatment is free at clinics in most neighborhoods, though the island's brand of universal coverage faces unspecified cuts to stem what Raul Castro called ''simply unsustainable spending'' in an August speech.
''When a person goes to the neighborhood clinic with a cold he's checked for the virus. And that's how we're going to confront the second wave,'' Estruch said. ''I'm not saying there isn't an epidemic in Cuba. There is. But it's limited.''
What Cuba won't do this time around is close its borders again. The May travel ban was ''totally necessary at that time'' because nobody knew what they were up against, Estruch said.
Today, passengers arriving at Havana's Jose Marti International Airport are still greeted by customs workers wearing face masks. They are asked if they have flulike symptoms and are subject to a thermal imaging scan. Airline pilots are required to report if any passengers were sick.
Dr. Jarbas Barbosa of the Pan American Health Organization praised Cuba's close collaboration with international health agencies. But he questioned the government's methods of isolating people to stem the spread of the virus.
''In general, we have no evidence that they work,'' said Barbosa, who is chief of health surveillance and disease management. ''And they can produce a profound social and economic impact.''_____________________________________________________

Blogging, a weapon of rebellious youth

Cuba's next revolution will be waged in the blogsphere, says the Israeli newspaper Ha'aretz in an article titled, fittingly enough, "Cuba's next revolution." Sample:
• The recent Juanes concert, "however unprecedented, does not herald a true change for Cuba, which hasn't had free elections for over half a century, where personal and political freedom is restricted and where the economy is in a state of perpetual collapse due to the American embargo.
(foto) "The significant indicators of the prospect of change are a growing group of young Cubans who are expressing their critical opinions in blogs hosted on servers outside Cuba, where the government cannot tamper with them, a phenomenon that has been dubbed blogostroika. In the weeks leading up to the concert, Cuban bloggers waged a furious debate about its political ramifications, and when it was over, they packed their blogs with impressions and photos. In Cuba, this type of openness is a concrete challenge to the status quo."
Young Cubans today, "were not raised to believe in the ethos of Soviet invincibility, and they are not captive to the conception that Fidel Castro holds the absolute truth."
For more, click here. Posted by Renato Perez at 08:57 AM in Media

Source: Cuban Colada
_____________________________________________________



Cuba is ready to use just about everything at its disposal, from its well-oiled civil defense system to the soldiers of a totalitarian government, to keep swine flu cases to a minimum.  Everything but a vaccine. [AP]
20091004 at 2035 by Armando F. Mastrapa 3d | Permalink
Cesar Alvarado (r). Image: El Universal
PAIS director Cesar Alvarado (r) forming a cavalry. Image: El Universal
It looks like Ecuador is adopting Cuba’s CDR model to surveil rural areas of the country, reports El Universal.
A force of 15,000 members is being proposed first for Manabi province.
Cesar Alvarado, director of PAIS, said: “The CDR (Committee of Citizen Revolution — Comites de Revolucion Ciudadana) will be responsible for monitoring the Citizen Revolution Project promoted by president of the republic Rafael Correa.”
Alvarado rejects criticism of the CDR. He said one of the functions of its members will be a permanent vigilance of government works executed in rural communities.
He further added, “We don’t want to be demonized by saying we will be like Cuba. The CDRs are for strengthening democracy and not allow what happen to Honduran president Zelaya, a coup d’ etat to take place.”
Cuba implemented a neighborhood network of surveillance in the early 1960s, known as Committees for the Defense of the Revolution (Comités de Defensa de la Revolución), to watch the populace’s counterrevolutionary activities.
Source: Cubapolidata
__________________________________________________


Credibility You Say?

Not much time to post nowadays. But, here goes. Also, thanks to all those who share their comments. I will try to respond to all, and attempt to interact more with readers since I will be posting less.

Now where was I? Oh, yes. So, there was a new poll taken concerning last month's Peace without Borders concert in Cuba [PDF]. According to the new numbers, the majority of Cuban-Americans interviewed (53%) had a favorable opinion of the concert (a stark change from a previous poll showing a majority opposed to the planned concert [PDF]). I had commented elsewhere that perhaps Cubans in Miami had changed their minds about the concert after it aired live on several local channels in Miami. Indications in the local media proved accurate.

What I found most interesting in the new poll (conducted by the Cuba Study Group and Bendixen and Associates), aside from the significant change in general opinion about the concert, was the data from the 50 and over category.

According to the new poll, Cuban-Americans over 49 years old were the largest group who watched the concert, and also the group that most changed their minds about the concert (about 10% more than younger Cubans). And, the most popular response given for the favorable views about the concert was: it "uplifted Cuban people" (51%).

So how did hard-liners in the media respond? As usual, they totally dismissed the poll. Aside from the fact that Radio Mambi generally ignores all facts that conflict with their propaganda goals, they sometimes have some reasons behind their behavior.

1) Radio Mambi hosts have concluded that the Peace without Borders concert was a secretly planned effort by the Obama administration to normalize relations with Cuba. Therefore, it should be viewed as a failed attempt at doing so, and condemned for trying. The new poll is merely another part of the conspiracy to normalize relations.

2) The new poll was conducted by Bendixen and Associates, a polling firm that has no credibility according to the hosts of Radio Mambi. Earlier this week, host Ninoska Perez-Castellon [photo above] cited two reasons: Bendixen polling was inaccurate in one Nicaraguan election, and inaccurate in the 2004 U.S. Presidential election.

She's correct in one example, but lying in the other.

According to Perez-Castellon, Bendixen polling totally missed the mark in 1990 (that's right, almost 20 years ago!) when it predicted an election victory for Daniel Ortega over Violeta Chamorro by 53% to 35%. Chamorro instead won with 55%.

What Perez-Castellon doesn't say is that Bendixen polling, by 1990, had several accurate predictions throughout Latin America. Also, Bendixen was not alone in its flawed data concerning Nicaragua, several other surveys had Ortega as the winner over Chamorro, with only a few polls reporting accurately.* Here's an explanation of what really happened.

Next, Perez-Castellon says that Bendixen polling predicted that John Kerry would win over George W. Bush in the 2004 elections. That's a lie. A review of Florida newspaper articles (via Newsbank) during the 2004 campaign shows that Bendixen polling never predicted a Kerry win (nationally or in Florida), but instead consistently revealed important data about hispanic and Cuban voting [article "Cuban Americans Split on Kerry"]. While Bendixen and Associates worked diligently with Democrats, providing information about changing attitudes within hispanic and Cuban voters, it never predicted a victory for John Kerry.

The only one whose credibility is suspect is Radio Mambi's.

*[Feb. 27, 1990, The Miami Herald, "For Pollsters, Upset Carries a Bitter Sting" by Tom Fiedler.]
Posted by Mambi_Watch at Saturday, October 03, 2009
Source: Mambi Watch


Thursday, September 17, 2009


Cuba’s Youth: The New Opposition

ICCAS' latest Cuba Focus, by Dr. Andy Gomez:

Cuba’s Youth: The New Opposition

Since the start of the Cuban Revolution, Fidel Castro and his government have transformed Cuba’s educational system into an indoctrinating tool to program Cuba’s youth to accept and promote Marxist ideology. Every student begins his school day by reciting in his school courtyard “Pioneros por el comunismo, seremos como el ‘Che’.” (“Pioneers for communism-we will be like ‘Che’”). However, the ideological ties of the youth are weak, to say the least; they have only a distorted version of what “El Che” actually represents. They also consider Fidel Castro to be a symbol of the past, not representative of their generation. There is a huge gap between the Cuban youth and the “Generation of the Revolution.” The older generation insists on remaining in the past and uses the revolution as an excuse to empower themselves and survive the rigors of everyday life in Cuba.
About 2.2 million out of 11.2 million Cubans on the island today were born after 1991. They have no real perspective of the true purpose of the Revolution and very little knowledge of Cuba’s long history and culture, since most of Cuba’s history books focus on 1959 and beyond. People that live under totalitarian regimes survive within a “culture of fear.” They have developed a set of values and attitudes that define their daily behavior in order to meet their own wants and needs which are not compatible with the restrictions imposed by the state; the Cuban people are no exception.

Since 2002, we at the Institute for Cuban and Cuban-American Studies at the University of Miami, have interviewed and surveyed hundreds of recently arrived Cubans, in addition to communicating regularly with Cuban youth groups on the island, in an effort to better understand their values and attitudes as a consequence of living in a totalitarian state. To better comprehend their patterns of psychological and social behavior, we used C.C. Hughes’ methodology (1993) which defines culture as (1) A socially transmitted system of ideas (2) that shapes and describes experiences, (3) gives names to surrounding realities, (4) is saved by members of a particular group, and (5) coordinates and determines behavior. We followed many of these individuals for a six month period and found that many began to adopt new values and attitudes that are expected in a free civil society.

Today, the values imposed by the totalitarian regime of the Castro brothers are being challenged by a new opposition—Cuba’s youth. To them the values of the Revolution are not relevant; they have started to contradict the purpose and principles of the current socialist system. Cuba’s youth are an opposition that wants “change,” even if that change is not fully defined. Most want their basic needs to be met such as better housing, more food, jobs, etc. They all want hope for the future, freedom and the right to pursue their own happiness.

Even though some of the youth have become apathetic or distrustful of politics, many do want to play a role in shaping Cuba’s future government. Yet, the space provided by the current government is very limited and controlled. Some of these youngsters have been expelled from universities or fired from their jobs simply for questioning the Cuban government’s policies and practices.

The biggest challenge for Cuba’s youth, and anyone else on the island, will be to figure out how to psychologically transform their values and attitudes in order to develop and sustain a democratic society in the future. We have learned many lessons from Central and Eastern European countries that have gone from a totalitarian regime to a more “democratic” system. Their outcomes have been mixed—it is not easy; it takes time, tolerance, compromise and a willingness to learn from the past to build a better future.

Finally, one last essential challenge will be how to keep the young in Cuba. Their patience is running out, understandably so. In interviews recently conducted with young people on the island, it’s clear that there is some hope that once Fidel Castro is dead, General Raul Castro could very well introduce new reforms; these reforms may be too late and deal mostly with the current economic crisis. In the eyes of Cuba’s youth, Raul Castro will try to preserve the failed ideology of the Revolution. For them, this is unacceptable. The Cuban youth’s demands go much beyond what Raul Castro is willing to give. The frustrations amongst Cuba’s youth remain deep and the reality of the everyday struggle for freedom persists. How much longer can the system survive?
_________________________________________________
*Dr. Andy S. Gomez is Associate Provost, University of Miami; Senior Fellow, Institute for Cuban and Cuban-American Studies and Nonresident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution.He was assisted in this article by Vanessa Lopez, Research Associate at ICCAS, and Giselle Recarey-Delgado, UM student.
Posted by V at 11:25 AM
Source: My Cuba Thoughts
________________________________________________________

 Miami Changes  its mind


[juanes_TIME.jpg]
Time will tell if Juanes changed anything in Cuba, but it seems his concert changed some minds in Miami.

A pre-concert poll (pdf) of Cuban American opinion, which to its great credit the Cuba Study Group released even though it showed that its own view was a minority view, showed that only 27 percent of Cuban Americans had a favorable opinion of it.

After the concert, a second poll (pdf) now shows that favorable opinion of the concert jumped to 53 percent. The survey also shows that 77 percent of respondents age 50 and higher watched the concert.

One Cuban American who changed his mind about the event was businessman Sergio Pino, who wrote in the Miami Herald that he was “skeptical” of the concert, “believing that somehow the presence of such a prominent artist would provide the Cuban dictatorship with useful propaganda.”

Mr. Pino continued:

“In my opinion the concert was a success. Juanes had good intentions – and they showed. He offered a message of love and unity for all Cubans. He shouted ‘Cuba libre’ more than once, and his song about an island in the middle of the sea, begging for liberty, jerked tears from everyone.

“Juanes opened the door to change; it is time to rethink our strategy. With three Cuban-American members of Congress, and one in the Senate, and many well-meaning Cuban-American leaders of hundreds of different political organizations in exile, it is time for one of them to come forward and unite us behind a new and more effective approach that focuses on the Cuban people first.”

When Mr. Pino addresses the Cuban Americans in Congress, he does so as a very substantial contributor to pro-embargo legislators and the major political action committees that support the embargo.

[TIME magazine photo.]
Source: The Cuban Triangle
___________________________________________________________




Message to Obama voters: Are you sorry yet?



H/T:  Agustin

Rove Backs Rubio

From PolitcalWire via Riehl World View: "Rove Backs Rubio In Florida."
Former Bush political adviser Karl Rove "has signaled his preference" in Florida's U.S. Senate race "with his wallet."
Rove confirmed to NBC News "that he has contributed a $1000 to Rubio's campaign, the donation will be made public when Rubio files his next FEC report (due Oct. 15)."
"This comes on the heels of Jeb Bush's public signal that he plans to stay neutral in the Crist-Rubio primary; Many believe this is Jeb's way of quietly telling influential Florida Republicans that he'd prefer Rubio but doesn't want to alienate Crist since he's still the heavy favorite in the primary. For Rubio, he needs to show some viability and that begins with his next fundraising report. But the most important fundraising report might actually be by the end of the year when you'll truly be able to see how Rubio's been able to use the Jeb neutrality (support?) to his advantage. Remember, Jeb is to Florida Republicans what Reagan is to the party nationally, he's held in THAT high of regard."

Source : babalú

 ___________________________________________________________

Agustin Cervantes, Cuban Political Prisoner of the Week, 10/4/09

Carcelcuba

The Castro dictatorship views those Cubans who oppose it as a matter of principle as nothing more than common criminals. When it wants to put them away in its gulag, the dictatorship charges them with "common" crimes like "assault" and "threatening." It gives the repression a veneer of legal legitimacy the dictatorship sees as necessary to disguise what really is going on.
That is what happened recently to Agustin Cervantes, a leader of the Christian Liberation Movement's (MCL) Varela Project.
A day after he was arrested, Cervantes on Sept. 29 was sentenced to 2 years in prison after he was convicted of "injuries," another one of those "common" crimes the dictatorship uses to try to silence its political opponents.
According to MCL leader Oswaldo Payá, the charge stems from an incident a few days earlier when a real criminal — probably someone sent by the authorities — went to Cervantes' home and began cursing him. He then pulled out a knife and tried to stab Cervantes, an attack Cervantes and a neighbor were able to fight off.
The attack culminated several recent incidents targeting Cervantes, including one in which a police agent warned him that he would not be allowed to participate in the next stage of the Varela Project campaign, according to Payá.
Payá said Cervantes' imprisonment is nothing more than a "gimmick" by the dictatorship to attack the MCL and to derail the Varela Project.
In this audio recording, Oswaldo Payá describes what happened to Agustin Cervantes, including how he had no chance to prepare a legal defense. The police went to his house on Monday and said, "It's time for your trial," and took him into custody.
Payá also posted on his Web site a time line, in English, of how the Cuban authorities targeted Cervantes and other MCL activists, culminating with Cervantes' imprisonment. The insidiousness of the Cuban secret police is not surprising, but the list of events is still chilling. (En español, aquí.)
Posted by Marc R. Masferrer on October 03, 2009 at 03:52 PM in Cuba, Cuba - Political Prisoner of the Week
Source: Common Sense




Profesionales y religiosos de EEUU se suman al alza de los viajes a Cuba...



frobles@MiamiHerald.com

Joan Brown Campbell, la líder religiosa que se hizo amiga del niño Elián González durante su estancia en Miami hace una década, ha visitado Cuba 37 veces, excepto durante el gobierno de George Bush, cuando durante cuatro años seguidos las autoridades federales le denegaron la autorización necesaria.
Este año la solicitó otra vez, ahora con Barack Obama en la Casa Blanca, y le otorgaron la licencia de inmediato. El Departamento de Estados incluso aprobó que invitara a varios académicos cubanos a visitar Nueva York. Entre los que asistieron a una conferencia organizada por Brown el mes pasado estuvo Ofelia Ortega, legisladora de la Asamblea Nacional del Poder Popular de Cuba.
"La Sección de Intereses de Estados Unidos en La Habana me dijo: ‘Deme los nombres de las personas que quiere que vayan; los llamaremos para que vengan a recoger su visa' '', declaró Brown. "Esto es muy poco común. En el pasado la gente tenía que hacer filas largas y esperar tres meses a que le aprobaran la visa. Llevo 35 años haciendo esto y me asombra.
"No rechazaron a nadie''.
Aunque Obama no ha cambiado oficialmente las normas sobre los viajes no familiares a Cuba, las estadísticas del Departamento de Estado muestran pruebas anecdóticas de un aumento en esos viajes.
Desde octubre del 2008 hasta agosto del 2009, un total de 16,217 cubanos viajaron a la isla desde Estados Unidos, un aumento en comparación con 10,661 durante el mismo período del 2007-08, muestran las cifras oficiales.
El miércoles, el Laboratorio Marino Mote, de Sarasota, anunció que una delegación del Ministerio de Ciencias, Tecnología y el Ambiente de Cuba realizará una visita a su sede esta semana.
Varios expertos dicen que aunque no se han publicado estadísticas de cuántos académicos, músicos y grupos religiosos estadounidenses han visitado la isla durante el gobierno de Obama, el Departamento de Estados ha hecho menos estricta la interpretación de las leyes en vigor.
Desde abogados hasta actores y músicos, más estadounidenses viajan a Cuba en visitas personales. Bill Richardson, gobernador de Nuevo México, recientemente viajó a la isla con una delegación de comercio y el actor Benicio Del Toro ha viajado dos veces desde que su película Che se estrenó el año pasado.
Cuba Education Tours ofrece a profesionales estadounidenses consejos sobre cómo cumplir los requisitos para recibir una licencia general de viajes de investigación. La empresa ofrece viajes por el Día de Acción de Gracias, Navidad y el "51 Aniversario del Triunfo de la Revolución y Año Nuevo''.
"Aunque el gobierno no ha publicado los cambios que permiten más intercambios culturales y educativos con Cuba, la evidencia anecdótica sugiere que el relajamiento de las normas ya comenzó'', aseguró la representante federal Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, republicana por Miami y crítica de la política de Obama hacia la isla. "Vemos anuncios que informan a los estudiantes universitarios y grupos artísticos sobre excursiones a la isla. Así que parece que hemos regresado a la era de los cursos universitarios de dos semanas sobre cultura cubana que se dictan en las playas de Varadero''.
La Oficina de Control de Activos Extranjeros del Departamento del Tesoro declinó repetidas solicitudes de estadísticas de cuántos estadounidenses fueron autorizados a viajar a Cuba este año. El Departamento de Estado reconoce que el gobierno de Bush interpretó estrictamente las leyes en vigor sobre el asunto.
"En realidad, no ha habido una directiva oficial, y ciertamente no ha habido un cambio de política'', aseguró Bisa Williams, subsecretaria adjunta en funciones del Departamento de Estado para Asuntos de las Américas. "Ha habido un aumento. Nos limitamos a decir que nos guiamos por la ley. Todavía revisamos en detalle toda solicitud''.
De hecho,, la prensa cubana reportó esta semana que 30 científicos estadounidenses no recibieron autorización de Washington para asistir a una conferencia médica este mes en la isla.
Las llamadas "licencias personales'' datan del gobierno de Clinton, cuando existía una categoría especial de viajes para las visitas académicas y culturales. Eso significaba que algunos grupos no tenían que solicitar un permiso especial cada vez que viajaban a la isla, lo que provocó el surgimiento de un sector especializado en llevar grupos de intereses especiales de visita a Cuba.
Pero Bush detuvo esa práctica, que según los expertos fue objeto de amplios abusos por parte de turistas que visitaron las playas de la isla bajo el pretexto del enriquecimiento académico o cultural. Los que defienden mayores relaciones entre los dos países afirman que los viajes son necesarios para derribar las barreras entre dos naciones hostiles desde hace mucho tiempo.
"Había una política generalizada de obstaculizar todos los contactos entre los estadounidenses y los cubanos'', indicó el abogado Robert Muse, experto en el embargo estadounidense a la isla. ‘‘Casi todas las solicitudes [de viaje] se rechazaron durante ese período. Aunque ahora pueden haber aumentado los viajes, lo que Obama no ha hecho es regresar a las licencias''.
En el 2007 el gobierno de Bush sólo autorizó a siete estadounidenses a viajar a Cuba para presentaciones artísticas o competencias deportivas.
El Departamento de Estado informa ahora que están autorizando presentaciones artísticas pero que se fijan en cosas como el precio de los boletos.
El cantante colombiano Juanes se reunió con la secretaria de Estado Hillary Clinton en mayo para promover su idea de un concierto en La Habana el 20 de septiembre. Como el espectáculo era abierto al público, el Departamento autorizó a músicos estadounidenses a participar.
Obama también puso fin a la práctica de Bush de impedir la participación de académicos cubanos en conferencias en Estados Unidos.
"La cooperación académica es muy importante, de manera que los profesores cubanos se sentían muy limitados antes'', indicó el politólogo cubano Rafael Hernández, quien recibió una visa para asistir a la conferencia organizada por Brown Campbell y este semestre es profesor visitante en la Universidad de Texas. "A los profesores no les gustaba no poder participar. Es muy pronto para decir si ha habido un cambio real''.
Hernández indicó que recibió visa dos veces durante el gobierno de Bush y que se la negaron ‘‘varias otras veces''. Hernández había visitado Estados Unidos por última vez en el 2006.
Los críticos de los viajes aseguran que el reciente aumento demuestra que Obama no necesita un cambio oficial de política que contemple licencias especiales.
"La ley permite todo eso sin ningún cambio'', subrayó Mauricio Claver-Carone, cabildero a favor del embargo. "Hay viajes que tienen un propósito. El gobierno ha sido menos estricto en autorizar viajes que la administración pasada, pero eso sigue el patrón de los demócratas''.
Pero los activistas han exhortado a Obama a hacer más por cambiar las normas oficialmente, no reinterpretarlas.
"Obama es demasiado cauteloso'', consideró Silvia Wilhelm, quien dirige la Comisión Cubanoamericana de Derechos de la Familia. "No sé porqué simplemente no han dicho que hay nuevas licencias. Creo que prefieren ser cautelosos en este campo, y reconozcámoslo, es un campo minado''.
Como Obama ya autorizó a los cubanoamericanos a viajar y enviar dinero a la isla de manera ilimitada, probablemente espera que el gobierno de Castro haga concesiones similares antes de liberalizar los viajes para los estadounidenses, amplió.
"Esto no es una rumba. Es un danzón: pasito a pasito'', declaró Wilhelm. "Ahora tenemos que ver si la otra pareja también da sus pasitos''.

Fuente: frobles@MiamiHerald.com

_____________________________________________________________

Represión y no vacunas contra la gripe porcina


Las preparaciones para combatir un posible brote de gripe en el invierno involucran a todos los ministerios y las fuerzas armadas.
Las preparaciones para combatir un posible brote de gripe en el invierno involucran a todos los ministerios y las fuerzas armadas.
Franklin Reyes / AP

LA HABANA -- Cuba está lista para emplear todo el arsenal a su disposición para enfrentar la gripe porcina, desde su bien aceitado sistema de defensa civil hasta los soldados de su sistema comunista, es decir, todo menos una vacuna.
Las autoridades sanitarias cubanas dicen que apostar a una vacuna para contener una pandemia mundial es algo arriesgado y desmoralizador.
"Todavía no se sabe si (la vacuna) funciona'', declaró a la AP el doctor Luis Estruch, viceministro de salud pública. " ¿Qué seguridad va a tener? Eso no lo sabe el mundo científico todavía''.
También mencionó el alto costo de una vacuna cuya confiabilidad todavía no está plenamente demostrada.
El avanzado sistema de salud cubano y su aislamiento geográfico han hecho que se registrasen apenas 435 casos de gripe porcina en una población de 11 millones de habitantes, y ninguna muerte. Esto representa un infectado por cada 25,000 personas, comparado con 6,900 en Estados Unidos y 4,000 en México.
Las preparaciones para combatir un posible brote en el invierno boreal involucran a todos los ministerios y las fuerzas armadas. De ser necesario, el gobierno aislaría barrios e incluso pueblos enteros, cerraría carreteras y despacharía equipos médicos a las comunidades afectadas por la gripe, indicó Estruch.
Los soldados pueden ir de puerta en puerta para asegurarse que se cumplen las órdenes de cuarentena y de evacuación. Las autoridades están dispuestas a aislar personas y comunidades si lo consideran oportuno.
"En cuestión de horas podemos determinar cuáles recursos enviar'', dijo Estruch. Agregó que se han contemplado numerosas variantes: "Si hay que paralizar un pueblo, si hay que paralizar el transporte público, si hay que parar las escuelas, si hay que tomar otras medidas...".
El modelo cubano funciona, pero a costa de las libertades individuales, según José Azel, economista del Instituto de Estudios Cubanos y Cubanoamericanos de la Universidad de Miami.
Cuba "tiene la ventaja de que puede hacer algo que nosotros no podemos hacer: darle órdenes al pueblo'', expresó.
El virus ha causado al menos 3,205 muertes a nivel mundial, según la Organización Mundial de la Salud. Se han confirmado más de 250,000 casos, aunque la mayoría no requirieron tratamiento.
Las vacunas son el eje central de la batalla contra la gripe porcina de muchos países, incluido Estados Unidos.
Pero Cuba tiene otro enfoque, y no porque no esté en condiciones de producir una vacuna.
La isla tiene un Centro de Biotecnología e Ingeniería Genética que fabrica un centenar de productos, incluidas más de tres docenas de drogas para combatir enfermedades infecciosas. Y cuenta con 12,000 científicos, una cifra muy alta para un país tan pequeño y pobre, lo que refleja la importancia que se le da a la medicina y la ciencia.
"Si tuviésemos confianza en una vacuna, la conseguiríamos. De inmediato'', dijo Estruch.
Pero agregó que no es recomendable prometer una cura para un tipo de gripe que puede mutar en cualquier momento. Y recordó la campaña que hizo Estados Unidos en 1976 para vacunar a millones de personas en previsión de un brote de gripe porcina que nunca se dio.
Cientos de personas atribuyeron a la vacuna otras enfermedades y hubo demandas que costaron al gobierno casi $100 millones.
Cuba tiene un sistema de defensa civil que ha realizado evacuaciones masivas y salvado muchas vidas cuando huracanes azotaron la isla.
Su programa de respuesta a emergencias, supervisado por el presidente Raúl Castro y las fuerzas armadas, está organizado a nivel de cuadras en cada pueblo y el gobierno recoge información sanitaria a diario de su amplia red de clínicas barriales.
"Cuando hay huracanes, hay gente en cada sector responsable de estar pendiente de lo que sucede: quién necesita asistencia, las mujeres embarazadas, los ancianos, los edificios vulnerables'', dijo Wayne Smith, un ex diplomático destacado en Cuba y quien trabaja hoy con el Centro para Política Internacional de Washington. "Lo mismo sucede con el sistema de salud''.
Fue así que los cubanos detectaron sus primeros casos de gripe porcina.
Luego de que se reportó el brote en México el 24 de abril, el ministerio de salud observó a toda persona proveniente de ese país y luego prohibió durante un mes los viajes a y de México.
Diez días después, Cuba confirmó sus primeros casos: tres estudiantes mexicanos que habían llegado recientemente de su país.
"Los detuvimos en cuestión de horas, el 15 de mayo'', dijo Estruch.
Los estudiantes fueron atendidos y se les permitió permanecer en Cuba.
Todos de los barrios tienen clínicas gratuitas y Estruch explicó que cuando una persona va a uno de esos centros de salud por una influenza, se investiga si tiene el virus de la gripe porcina.
Agregó que Cuba no volverá a cerrar sus fronteras porque ya se sabe cuál es el problema. Indicó que las medidas de mayo fueron "totalmente necesarias'' en ese momento porque nadie sabía en qué consistía el brote.
El doctor Jarbas Barbosa, de la Organización Panamericana de la salud, elogió la estrecha colaboración de Cuba con los organismos internacionales de salud. Pero cuestionó el concepto de aislar personas para evitar la diseminación del mal.
"En general, no hay evidencia de que eso funciona'', manifestó Barbosa, quien es jefe del manejo de enfermedades. "Y puede tener un profundo impacto social y económico''.
Fuente: Associated Press
____________________________________________________________

Venezuela abre oficina en Cuba para advertir contra bases de EU


Ronald Blanco (centro), embajador de Venezuela en Cuba, preside la inauguración de una “base de paz”, en La Habana. EFE
  • Se brindará información sobre temas relacionados con la paz
El embajador venezolano en Cuba, Ronald Blanco, presidió la apertura de la base
LA HABANA, CUBA.- El Gobierno de Venezuela inauguró una “base de paz” en La Habana para brindar información sobre temas relacionados con la paz, y particularmente de los riesgos que supone la instalación de bases militares de Estados Unidos en América Latina.

El embajador venezolano en Cuba, Ronald Blanco, presidió la apertura de la base en la sede del Centro Bolivariano de Informática y Telemática “Livia Gouverneur”, ubicado en el mismo edificio en que se encuentra la embajada de Caracas en La Habana.

Las “bases de paz” son una respuesta del presidente venezolano, Hugo Chávez, a un acuerdo para el uso de bases militares colombianas por parte de Estados Unidos, y se pretende que la iniciativa se extienda por varios países latinoamericanos.

Blanco recordó que la iniciativa de Chávez busca “contrarrestar esta amenaza de la instalación de siete bases militares en territorio sudamericano y que presenta problemas de seguridad para nuestro país”.
Fuente: Informador:CRÉDITOS: EFE / RMP
___________________________________________________________


Latinoamérica/ Venezuela
Sólo las dictaduras impiden las visitas de los organismos internacionales

Cubamatinal/ La huelga de hambre que estos días protagonizaron decenas de estudiantes ante la sede de la Organización de Estados Americanos (OEA) volvió a colocar sobre el tapete un asunto que desde hace más de siete años se viene planteando de manera recurrente: Que el Gobierno autorice a la Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos (CIDH) visitar el país para verificar la situación de las garantías fundamentales.

Por Juan Francisco Alonso
Caracas, 3 de octubre/ El Universal/ Ante la reticencia de las autoridades a invitar a la instancia hemisférica, el ex presidente de ese organismo, Carlos Ayala Corao, advirtió: "Los países democráticos están abiertos a visitas de relatores de Naciones Unidas y de la CIDH. Los regímenes autoritarios o dictatoriales son los que se cierran a este tipo de visitas".
El jurista le salió al paso a los señalamientos del Ejecutivo sobre la supuesta parcialidad de la Comisión, razón esgrimida para no autorizar la llamada visita in loco. "Siempre hay una excusa. La excusa de (Augusto) Pinochet para no permitir más visita de la CIDH a Chile fue que ella estaba siendo manipulada por la izquierda internacional; y la excusa de Fidel Castro para no permitir las visitas de la CIDH a Cuba es que ella representa al imperialismo internacional. Sin importar su tendencia, los regímenes autoritarios siempre van a coincidir en escudarse en la soberanía para evitar este tipo de visitas y verificaciones", aseveró.
Ayala defendió la objetividad de los informes y reportes que ha emitido el organismo adscrito a la OEA en relación con Venezuela en los últimos años e indicó que los mismos se sustentan en fuentes y cifras oficiales; y le recomendó a las autoridades que permitan la visita. "Si un Estado considera que un reporte no plasma su punto de vista, pues debería permitir a quien lo redacta que pueda acceder a la fuente oficial. Nada mejor que una visita para establecer un contacto directo y una explicación que permita conocer la situación en el terreno", indicó quien se desempeñara como miembro de la CIDH entre 1996 y 1999.
De la misma manera recordó que este año la instancia hemisférica anunció que realizará un informe, sin importar si se permite venir o no al país; e indicó que de mantener su actual postura el Ejecutivo "perderá una oportunidad de brindarle una información de primera mano, mucho más completa a la Comisión que le permita a ella realizar un análisis más profundo sobre lo que ocurre en Venezuela". Por mal camino Ayala achacó la actual posición del Gobierno venezolano frente al organismo adscrito a la OEA a dos motivos: La mala asesoría cubana, "que es precisamente el otro país del hemisferio que está totalmente cerrado a las visitas de relatores de Naciones Unidas y de la Comisión"; y a su hipersensibilidad e intolerancia ante la crítica.
"En lugar de ver en los organismos de la OEA y de la ONU posibles enemigos y conspiradores hay que ver en ellos aliados en la promoción en la defensa y promoción de los derechos de la personas y si ellos señalan algunos errores, pues que nos ayuden a superarlos con recomendaciones", indicó. Interrogado sobre la utilidad de una eventual visita de la CIDH, visto que las recomendaciones que se hicieron en la última, realizada en 2002, no han sido atendidas por las autoridades nacionales, el experto en derechos humanos señaló: "Las recomendaciones se hacen para que un Estado las acoja de buena fe.
Si reconoces a un organismo y lo invitas no es para cumplir una formalidad, sino para acatar las sugerencias". Recordó que varios países que han sido visitados luego de presentado el informe establecen una relación de cooperación con la CIDH con el objeto de solventar los problemas y fallas. Ayala descartó que el Gobierno vaya a retirarse del sistema interamericano de protección de derechos humanos (Comisión y Corte Interamericana), pues indicó que ello implicaría retirarse de la OEA. "Sería convertir a Venezuela en una suerte de Albania del siglo pasado.
Sería aislarse totalmente en el ámbito internacional, cuando países como China, Rusia y Cuba están en un proceso de ratificación de instrumentos de derechos humanos. Este año, China y Cuba suscribieron el Pacto Internacional de Derechos Civiles y Políticos, y en años pasados Rusia se sometió a la jurisdicción de la Corte Europea de Derechos Humanos", concluyó.
Fuente: Cubamatinal
______________________________________________




Obama permite que los norteamericanos viajen a Cuba




Aunque no hubo cambios en la norma que regula esos viajes, los permisos son más accesibles que en la época de Bush. Académicos, músicos y religiosos aprovechan la apertura y aseguran que "no rechazaron a nadie"
Crédito: AP

Aunque el presidente Barak Obama no ha cambiado oficialmente las normas sobre los viajes no familiares a Cuba, las estadísticas del Departamento de Estado muestran pruebas anecdóticas de un aumento en esos viajes, según publica el diario El Nuevo Herald.

Es que desde octubre de 2008 hasta agosto de 2009, un total de 16.217 cubanos viajaron a la isla desde los Estados Unidos, y el aumento es importante si se lo compara con los 10.661 que viajaron durante el mismo período de 2007-2008, según muestran las cifras oficiales.

Varios expertos dicen que aunque no se han publicado estadísticas de cuántos académicos, músicos y grupos religiosos norteamericanos han visitado la isla durante el gobierno de Obama, el Departamento de Estado ha hecho menos estricta la interpretación de las leyes en vigor.

"Aunque el gobierno no ha publicado los cambios que permiten más intercambios culturales y educativos con Cuba, la evidencia anecdótica sugiere que el relajamiento de las normas ya comenzó'', aseguró la representante federal Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, republicana por Miami y crítica de la política de Obama hacia la isla.

"En realidad, no ha habido una directiva oficial, y ciertamente no ha habido un cambio de política'', aseguró Bisa Williams, subsecretaria adjunta en funciones del Departamento de Estado para Asuntos de las Américas, y agregó: "Ha habido un aumento. Nos limitamos a decir que nos guiamos por la ley. Todavía revisamos en detalle toda solicitud''.

Desde el Departamento de Estado reconocen que el gobierno de George W Bush interpretó estrictamente las leyes en vigor sobre el asunto y quienes defienden mayores relaciones entre los dos países afirman que los viajes son necesarios para derribar las barreras entre dos naciones hostiles desde hace mucho tiempo.

Por ejemplo, el cantante colombiano Juanes se reunió con la secretaria de Estado Hillary Clinton en mayo para promover su idea de un concierto en La Habana el 20 de septiembre pasado y, como el espectáculo era abierto al público, el Departamento autorizó a músicos norteamericanos a participar.

Obama también puso fin a la práctica de Bush de impedir la participación de académicos cubanos en conferencias en los Estados Unidos. "La cooperación académica es muy importante, de manera que los profesores cubanos se sentían muy limitados antes'', indicó el politólogo cubano Rafael Hernández, quien recibió una visa para asistir a la conferencia organizada por Brown Campbell y este semestre es profesor visitante en la Universidad de Texas.Fuente:Infobae